Results For France

$419.99

40% abv.  Distilled in 1967, Bottled in 2017

The Dartigalongue family started to distill in 1813 and is the oldest Bas Armagnac house (founded in 1838). While Dartigalongue owns vineyards, the house has always been famous for the way it ages its Armagnacs. In order to keep the focus on that great reputation, it stopped distilling about 5 years ago and now purchases its young Armagnacs from other producers in the village. They work a lot with the local Gascon oak, which gives various spice notes and contributes to the house style.

“Vintages are typical in Armagnac and Dartigalongue has an impressive collection with most years and even some from 1829. The best sommeliers in the world choose Dartigalongue and dinners are regularly built around their Armagnacs. Menus from top Parisien establishments, including the Moulin Rouge, adorn the walls of the company’s museum that also boasts an awe inspiring number of documents from the beginning of the company’s creation.” – Amanda Garnham, French Entree

$179.99

42% Abv.  Distilled in 1975, Bottled in 2015.

“A firm and intense Armagnac that stands out for its length. This will be well appreciated by lovers of older vintages. The nose is elegant, fine and sophisticated with aromas of dried fruit, cocoa and incense. After a few minutes of aeration, superb notes of white flowers rise from the glass. On the palate, the first attack is rounded, leaving behind explosive and progressive flavors of dried fruit. The persistent finish has notes of rancio and is slightly peppery.”  – Distillery Notes

The Dartigalongue family started to distill in 1813 and is the oldest Bas Armagnac house (founded in 1838). While Dartigalongue owns vineyards, the house has always been famous for the way it ages its Armagnacs. In order to keep the focus on that great reputation, it stopped distilling about 5 years ago and now purchases its young Armagnacs from other producers in the village. They work a lot with the local Gascon oak, which gives various spice notes and contributes to the house style.

“Vintages are typical in Armagnac and Dartigalongue has an impressive collection with most years and even some from 1829. The best sommeliers in the world choose Dartigalongue and dinners are regularly built around their Armagnacs. Menus from top Parisien establishments, including the Moulin Rouge, adorn the walls of the company’s museum that also boasts an awe inspiring number of documents from the beginning of the company’s creation.” – Amanda Garnham, French Entree

$399.99

Abv: 41%

Distilled in 1975.

Bottled in 2015, Single Cask.

100% Ugni Blanc. Less than 307 bottles were made.

1975 was a warm and dry year. The grapes got loaded with phenols.

Color: Golden Amber with tints of copper.

Nose: Delicate wood, intensely candied fruit, prunes and figs.

Palate: It touches all the aromatics listed above with a finish laced with anise and fenugreek.

$119.99

Abv: 43%.  Distilled in 1986, Bottled in 2016

The Dartigalongue family started to distill in 1813 and is the oldest Bas Armagnac house (founded in 1838). While Dartigalongue owns vineyards, the house has always been famous for the way it ages its Armagnacs. In order to keep the focus on that great reputation, it stopped distilling about 5 years ago and now purchases its young Armagnacs from other producers in the village. They work a lot with the local Gascon oak, which gives various spice notes and contributes to the house style.

“Vintages are typical in Armagnac and Dartigalongue has an impressive collection with most years and even some from 1829. The best sommeliers in the world choose Dartigalongue and dinners are regularly built around their Armagnacs. Menus from top Parisien establishments, including the Moulin Rouge, adorn the walls of the company’s museum that also boasts an awe inspiring number of documents from the beginning of the company’s creation.” – Amanda Garnham, French Entree

 

$22.99

Bonal Gentiane Quina is an aperitif that has things in common with both amari and sweet vermouth. It is an infusion of herbs like gentian and chinchona bark (also called quina, the source of quinine) in a fortified wine base that was first made in 1865.

Bonal is 32 proof, reddish brown in color, and moderately sweet. It smells and tastes strongly of red fruits like plums and cherries, but also herbs and licorice. The palate has a medium bodied texture, and has both the herbal bitterness of gentian and the chalky bitterness of chinchona intermixed with honey, plums and herbal flavors.

Bonal is imported into the United States by Haus Alpenz.

 

$32.99

16.5% alc./vol.

Black Raspberry Liqueur

A five-star liqueur, made with ‘black raspberries’ and other bramble fruits, infused in aged cognac. Perfect for dressing up desserts or sweetening a cocktail.

$59.99

55% alc./vol.

Produced by the Carthusian Fathers (monks), the Chartreuse recipe dates back to 1605. The recipe remains a closely-guarded secret; only three of the brothers know the names of the 130 plants and how to blend and distill them. They are also the only ones who know which plants must be macerated to produce the distinctive colour. They alone supervise the slow aging in oak casks over several years.

The monks maintain a simple, prayer-filled life in their ancient monastery. As they have done for centuries, they appoint three brothers who are charged with producing the Chartreuse and keeping the recipe secret, until it is time to pass it on to other brothers.

This is the only green liqueur in the world with a completely natural colour. The colour is derived from the plants and herbs in the recipe, with no additives or artificial colour.

$159.99

Chartreuse V.E.P., for Vieillissement Exceptionnellement Prolongé, is the luxe version. Aged for an extended period in oak casks, it mellows and intensifies to stunning effect. Earning rave reviews from tasters, these special V.E.P. bottles are presented with a wax-sealed cork and a wax-stamped back label, and shipped in individual wood boxes. These fine liqueurs offer a unique spirits experience.

Taste Profile:

Pale vibrant green, almost ‘day glo’. A plethora of aromas, including herbs, mint, orange rind, new leather, licorice, basil and spring flowers all vie for your attention. This sweet digestive has a constantly evolving flavour profile. Though the alcohol is high, the flavours are easily up to the task of keeping the heat in perfect line.

$119.99

This release was bottled in the beginning of 2016.  Chateau Busca is a powerhouse when it comes to Ugni Blanc’s terroir expression blending in with the Black Oak from the vicinity. The finish is lasts over 45 seconds. It lingers with warmth and silky phenols. There is ZERO bite from start to finish. 

” BEST BUY! 96-100 CLASSIC! ” – Wine Enthusiast

Wine Enthusiast: 98 points – The wonderfully zesty aroma includes notes of margarine, lanolin, dark caramel, buttery oak and holiday fruitcake. The palate entry is rich, creamy and honeyed; at midpalate the woody/creamy flavor suggests rancio beginnings. Finishes semisweet, cocoa- and maple sugar-like, and intensely oaky. Best Buy.

Ultimate Beverage Challenge: 95 points – The nose is gentle and suggests pastry cream and white grapes. The flavors are delicate in the mouth with trace hints of mace and nutmeg. The texture is overall round and smooth with some piquant spice lingering on the palate.

Abv: 40%

$99.99

40% alc./vol

The wine estate of Chateau Busca-Maniban covers nearly 500 acres in beautiful Ténarèze, and has produced Armagnac since the 17th century. Built by the Marquis de Maniban in 1649, the castle is one of the finest examples of 17th century Gascony architecture in existence. The elegance of the landmark Chateau, however, is only party of the allure. It is their venerable Armagnac that elevates Chateau Busca to its celebrated status. Ténarèze has been a grape-growing region since the Gallo-Roman era. The soil consists of a mixture of clay, limestone and sandy ‘boulbènes’ (a local word for alluvial soil). Ténarèze Armagnac is more full-bodied and richer in bouquet than those of neighboring regions, and although Bas-Armagnac has conventionally been considered the finest Armagnac producing region, Ténarèze Armagnac has been a spectacular resurgence in appreciation around the world’s Armagnac aficionados.

Decades of slow aging in black oak casks culminate in a truly unique Armagnac worthy of its collectible status. The clay and limestone soil in Ténarèze is exactly the same as in Cognac’s top growing regions of Grande Champagne where Ugni Blanc (grapes) reign. Armagnac from Ténarèze ages longer and better.

90-95 points Wine Enthusiast
*Superb/Highly Recommended* Understated floral scents of jasmine and honeysuckle along with aromas of dried yellow fruit, buttered almonds and orange blossom are discovered in the nose. The palate entry is lusciously oily, semisweet and buttery while the midpalate stage highlights the oak, cocoa, black tea and walnut paste. Finishes gracefully, semisweet, and tightly structured.

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